brothertedd:

Blade Runner (1982)

brothertedd:

Blade Runner (1982)

450 notes 

ruinedchildhood:

biggest plot twist of my childhood

170,273 notes 

funnyordie:

How to Enjoy Flowers

funnyordie:

How to Enjoy Flowers

904 notes 

cinephilearchive:

“The editor who was John McTiernan‘s perfect collaborator for ‘Die Hard’ because he was happy to ‘cut on movement’ when any other film editor would deem you as a filmmaker who doesn’t know what he’s doing, sits down to divulge some information on the process of editing. What is the process on a day-to-day basis for an editor? What is important to maintain a rhythm of a scene? How does temp music help an editor when he cuts a scene? What is an editor’s responsibility? These questions, among others will be answered by this generally unknown prolific editor who was behind some very interesting action films of the 90′s.” —Frank Urioste on film editing, filmschoolthrucommentaries

Urioste: I never had a director in the cutting room with me. They made their comments, they came in and looked at something, but when I cut, I cut by myself. Today, a lot of the directors want to sit there. I don’t think it’s a good thing, because you’re not getting the editor’s point of view.Honess: In the past, the director would give notes and go away. Now, they sit right beside you, because what used to take the afternoon takes minutes. Directors feel that they’re accomplishing something by sitting beside you, but that’s not always true. You lose the thinking time and the rationale of it all. A lot of editors complain about this now.Urioste: I was lucky — my mentor, the man who really taught me was Ralph Winters. I think he was the greatest editor who ever lived. He did all the big stuff at Metro — from ‘Singing in the Rain’ to ‘High Society’ to ‘Ben-Hur.’ He’s amazing, and he really, really helped me. I’d say Ralph Winters made me what I am today. —Peter Honess & Frank Urioste Talk About Their Work

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephilearchive:

“The editor who was John McTiernan‘s perfect collaborator for ‘Die Hard’ because he was happy to ‘cut on movement’ when any other film editor would deem you as a filmmaker who doesn’t know what he’s doing, sits down to divulge some information on the process of editing. What is the process on a day-to-day basis for an editor? What is important to maintain a rhythm of a scene? How does temp music help an editor when he cuts a scene? What is an editor’s responsibility? These questions, among others will be answered by this generally unknown prolific editor who was behind some very interesting action films of the 90′s.” —Frank Urioste on film editing, filmschoolthrucommentaries

Urioste: I never had a director in the cutting room with me. They made their comments, they came in and looked at something, but when I cut, I cut by myself. Today, a lot of the directors want to sit there. I don’t think it’s a good thing, because you’re not getting the editor’s point of view.
Honess: In the past, the director would give notes and go away. Now, they sit right beside you, because what used to take the afternoon takes minutes. Directors feel that they’re accomplishing something by sitting beside you, but that’s not always true. You lose the thinking time and the rationale of it all. A lot of editors complain about this now.
Urioste: I was lucky — my mentor, the man who really taught me was Ralph Winters. I think he was the greatest editor who ever lived. He did all the big stuff at Metro — from ‘Singing in the Rain’ to ‘High Society’ to ‘Ben-Hur.’ He’s amazing, and he really, really helped me. I’d say Ralph Winters made me what I am today. —Peter Honess & Frank Urioste Talk About Their Work

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

85 notes 

Simple, beautiful & ad-free. Read the manifesto: